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List of cultural assets of the Mt. Fuji World Cultural Heritage Site

1 Fujisan Mountain Area(Yamanashi Prefecture,Shizuoka Prefecture)

富士山域

Fujisan Mountain Area

It is thought that Fujisan's value as a World Cultural Heritage arises from the fact that it has become an "object of worship" and a "source of artistic inspiration" because of its sacred and magnificent landscape. The area (altitude of approx. 1,500m or higher) that is particularly important for that value of Fujisan is thought to be within the scope of the property. The reason lies in the fact that the scope of what has been depicted in famous pictures overlaps, and it is above "Umagaeshi," which is one of the borderlines for religious sacredness. This scope includes 8th station and above, where the Asama no Okami (the god of Sengen) is thought to be enshrined, and the view from Lake Motosuko, which is used on things such as the currently issued 1,000 yen banknote.

1-1 Mountaintop worship sites

山頂の信仰遺跡

Mountaintop worship sites

Religion-related facilities such as shrines are distributed around the crater wall at the top of the mountain. Once people began making worship-ascents of Fujisan, temples were built, Buddhist statues, etc. were offered, and religious activities at the top of the mountain became systemized. Even now, many climbers do things at the top of the mountain such as worshipping of "Goraiko(sunrise)", or circling around the crater ( a ritual called "Ohachimeguri"), and the essence of Fujisan worship is thus reliably passed down to modern times.

1-2 Omiya-Murayama Ascending Route (present Fujinomiya Ascending Route)

大宮・村山口登山道

Omiya-Murayama Ascending Route (present Fujinomiya Ascending Route)

This ascending route begins at Fujisan Hongu Sengen Taisha shrine, goes past Murayama Sengen-jinja Shrine, and leads to the south side of the summit. It is thought that the activities of Matsudai from the beginning to the middle of the 12th century were the catalyst for people to begin climbing the mountain. After that, ordinary people began to make worship-ascents of Fujisan. People climbing Fujisan were depicted in Fuji Mandala painted on Silk, which is thought to have been made in the 16th century. The scope of the constituent element is 6th station of the present Fujinomiya Ascending Route and above.

1-3 Suyama Ascending Route (present Gotemba Ascending Route)

須山口登山道

Suyama Ascending Route (present Gotemba Ascending Route)

This ascending route begins at Suyama Sengen-jinja Shrine and leads to the southeast side of the summit. Although the route's origin is unclear, its existence in the year 1486 can be confirmed by ancient documents. The route incurred catastrophic damage from Fujisan's Hoei eruption (1707), and then it was fully restored in 1780. The scope of the constituent element is the altitude of 2,050m (where the present Gotemba Ascending Route is) and above, and the area around Suyama Otainai (altitude of 1,435 - 1,690m).

1-4 Subashiri Ascending Route

須走口登山道

Subashiri Ascending Route

This ascending route begins at Fuji Sengen-jinja Shrine, converges with Yoshida Ascending Route at 8th station, and leads to the east side of the summit. Although the route's origin is unclear, a Buddhist tablet with the year 1384 carved on it has been excavated there. Many adherents of Fuji-ko and other religious beliefs began to use it in the late 18th century. The scope of the constituent element is 5th station and above.

1-5 Yoshida Ascending Route

吉田口登山道

Yoshida Ascending Route

This ascending route begins at Kitaguchi Hongu Fuji Sengen-jinja Shrine and leads to the top of Fujisan. In the late 14th century, lodges started to be built for people making pilgrimages here, and facilities were created for large numbers of climbers. Jikigyo Miroku, who built the foundation of Fuji-ko's prosperity, designated the Yoshida Ascending Route as the main ascending route for adherents, and as a result it has been used by the most people since the late 18th century, when Fuji-ko adherents gradually increased.

1-6 Kitaguchi Hongu Fuji Sengen-jinja Shrine

北口本宮冨士浅間神社

Kitaguchi Hongu Fuji Sengen-jinja Shrine

This shrine originated as a place to worship Asama no Okami from afar. In 1480 a Fujisan torii gate was built, and in the middle of the 16th century the Sengen-jinja Shrine buildings were put in place. The shrine has a strong connection with Fuji-ko. In the 1730s its buildings were restored using contributions by Murakami Kosei, who was a Fuji-ko leader, and the foundation of the current shrine compound scenery was formed.

1-7 Lake Saiko

西湖

Lake Saiko

These are scenic spots with deep connections to many works of art. Fujisan reflected on the surface of a lake is referred to as "Fujisan in reverse" and is famous as a beautiful sight. In particular, photographs of Lake Motosuko and Fujisan have been used several times in the design of bank notes. The eight lakes around Fujisan were visited by many Fuji-ko adherents as part of their religious practices, but through the ages Fujigoko (Fuji Five Lakes) have been counted as the destinations of pilgrimages.

1-8 Lake Shojiko

精進湖

Lake Shojiko

These are scenic spots with deep connections to many works of art. Fujisan reflected on the surface of a lake is referred to as "Fujisan in reverse" and is famous as a beautiful sight. In particular, photographs of Lake Motosuko and Fujisan have been used several times in the design of bank notes. The eight lakes around Fujisan were visited by many Fuji-ko adherents as part of their religious practices, but through the ages Fujigoko (Fuji Five Lakes) have been counted as the destinations of pilgrimages.

1-9 Lake Motosuko

本栖湖

Lake Motosuko

These are scenic spots with deep connections to many works of art. Fujisan reflected on the surface of a lake is referred to as "Fujisan in reverse" and is famous as a beautiful sight. In particular, photographs of Lake Motosuko and Fujisan have been used several times in the design of bank notes. The eight lakes around Fujisan were visited by many Fuji-ko adherents as part of their religious practices, but through the ages Fujigoko (Fuji Five Lakes) have been counted as the destinations of pilgrimages. 

2 Fujisan Hongu Sengen Taisha Shrine

富士山本宮浅間大社

Fujisan Hongu Sengen Taisha Shrine

The shrines that were built to worship Fujisan as Asama no Okami are Sengen-jinja shrines, and Fujisan Hongu Sengen Taisha shrine is the headquarter of Sengen-jinja shrines. According to the historical document of the shrine, it was moved to its current location from Yamamiya. Religious beliefs gathered there beginning around the 9th century, and the current shrine pavilions were built under the special protection of Tokugawa Ieyasu. In addition, in the wake of Ieyasu's dedication, the area of Fujisan from 8th station to the top is managed as a sacred symbol of the goddess. The compounds of the shrine contain "Wakutamaike Pond," which is Fujisan's spring-fed pond, and in the past religious believers would use its water to purify their bodies here before climbing Fujisan.

3 Yamamiya Sengen-jinja Shrine

山宮浅間神社

Yamamiya Sengen-jinja Shrine

According to the historical document of Fujisan Hongu Sengen Taisha Shrine, Yamamiya Sengen-jinja Shrine was the predecessor of Fujisan Hongu Sengen Taisha Shrine and was built by Yamato Takeru. There is no building in the place for the inner shrine, and it is presumed that the unique configuration of creating a place for worshipping Fujisan from afar remained in a form of ancient Fujisan worship in which the mountain was worshipped in order to ward off eruptions.

4 Murayama Sengen-jinja Shrine

村山浅間神社

Murayama Sengen-jinja Shrine

Once Mt. Fuji's volcanic activity subsided around the 12th century, people such as Matsudai began to conduct ascetic training on the mountain. This expanded, and in the beginning of the 14th century the religion Shugen-do practiced on Fujisan was formed. Murayama Sengen-jinja Shrine (also called Koho-ji) was at the center of this. Until the late 19th century, Shugen-do practitioners managed the Omiya-Murayama Ascending Route.

5 Suyama Sengen-jinja Shrine

須山浅間神社

Suyama Sengen-jinja Shrine

Suyama Sengen-jinja Shrine became the point of origin of the Suyama Trail. The shrine pavilions as well as the trail incurred major damage from the Hoei eruption of 1707, and the current inner shrine was rebuilt in 1823. According to shrine legend, it was built by Yamato Takeru, and wooden markers indicating the buildings' construction dates make it possible to confirm that the shrine existed in 1524.

6 Fuji Sengen-jinja Shrine (Subashiri Sengen-jinja Shrine)

冨士浅間神社(須走浅間神社)

Fuji Sengen-jinja Shrine (Subashiri Sengen-jinja Shrine)

Fuji Sengen Shrine became the starting point of the Subashiri Ascending Route. It attracted many adherents of the Fuji-ko religion, and there remain approximately 70 commemorative markers indicating things such as a person climbing Fujisan 33 times. According to shrine legend, it was built in 807. Although it incurred major damage from the Hoei eruption (1707), it was rebuilt in 1718 and has since been repeatedly repaired to reach its current state.

7 Kawaguchi Asama-jinja Shrine

河口浅間神社

Kawaguchi Asama-jinja Shrine

It is said that this was the first Sengen-jinja Shrine built on the north side of Fujisan, and that it was built as a result of eruptions that occurred in the late 9th century. The Kawaguchi area that is centered on the shrine developed as a settlement of religious guides called "Oshi" from the late middle ages when worship-ascent of Fujisan became popular, until the Edo Period. Religious events closely connected with Fujisan are still conducted today.

8 Fuji Omuro Sengen-jinja Shrine

冨士御室浅間神社

Fuji Omuro Sengen-jinja Shrine

It is said that this shrine was built in the beginning of the 9th century, at the 2nd station of the Yoshida Ascending Route, and there are also documents that say that this was the earliest dedicated shrine in the mountain of Fujisan. The Main Hall was moved without change to the foot of the mountain in the 1970s, but this shrine has come to function as a combination of Motomiya at 2nd station, which is positioned as a base for various forms of Fujisan worship such as Shugen and worship-ascents, and Satomiya at the foot of the mountain, which serves as a god of the land.

9.10 “Oshi” Lodging House (Former House of the Togawa Family,House of the Osano Family)

御師住宅

“Oshi” Lodging House (Former House of the Togawa Family)

"Oshi" took care of Fuji-ko adherents when they made worship-ascents by providing them with lodging and food. They usually worked to spread Fujisan worship and engaged in prayer-giving and invocation. Many "Oshi" Lodging Houses were rectangular, with an entrance way facing the main street, and had buildings that was used for both residential and lodging purposes and located behind the waterway that ran through the precincts. The photograph shows the Former House of the Tokgawa Family.
*10 The House of the Osano family is closed to the public. (A model of the restored house can be seen at the Fujiyoshida Museum of Local History. )

(“Oshi” lodging house (Former House of the Togawa Family))

11 Lake Yamanakako

山中湖

Lake Yamanakako

These are scenic spots with deep connections to many works of art. Fujisan reflected on the surface of a lake is referred to as "Fujisan in reverse" and is famous as a beautiful sight. In particular, photographs of Lake Motosuko and Fujisan have been used several times in the design of bank notes. The eight lakes around Fujisan were visited by many Fuji-ko adherents as part of their religious practices, but through the ages Fujigoko (Fuji Five Lakes) have been counted as the destinations of pilgrimages.

12 Lake Kawaguchiko

河口湖

Lake Kawaguchiko

These are scenic spots with deep connections to many works of art. Fujisan reflected on the surface of a lake is referred to as "Fujisan in reverse" and is famous as a beautiful sight. In particular, photographs of Lake Motosuko and Fujisan have been used several times in the design of bank notes. The eight lakes around Fujisan were visited by many Fuji-ko adherents as part of their religious practices, but through the ages Fujigoko (Fuji Five Lakes) have been counted as the destinations of pilgrimages.

13 Oshino Hakkai springs (Deguchiike Pond)

忍野八海(出口池)

Oshino Hakkai springs (Deguchiike Pond)

These are eight springs formed by Fujisan's subsoil water, and each of the eight ponds was a pilgrimage destination of Fujisan worship in association with one of the Eight Dragon Kings. People making worship-ascents of Fujisan used the water of these ponds to wash away impurities. These are said to be historical hallowed sites called the "eight lakes at the base of Fujisan" in comparison with the eight lakes of religious training conducted by Hasegawa Kakugyo, and it is thought that they were reactivated by Fuji-ko adherents in 1843.

14 Oshino Hakkai springs (Okamaike Pond)

忍野八海(お釜池)

Oshino Hakkai springs (Okamaike Pond)

These are eight springs formed by Fujisan's subsoil water, and each of the eight ponds was a pilgrimage destination of Fujisan worship in association with one of the Eight Dragon Kings. People making worship-ascents of Fujisan used the water of these ponds to wash away impurities. These are said to be historical hallowed sites called the "eight lakes at the base of Fujisan" in comparison with the eight lakes of religious training conducted by Hasegawa Kakugyo, and it is thought that they were reactivated by Fuji-ko adherents in 1843.

15 Oshino Hakkai springs (Sokonashiike Pond)

忍野八海(底抜池)

Oshino Hakkai springs (Sokonashiike Pond)

These are eight springs formed by Fujisan's subsoil water, and each of the eight ponds was a pilgrimage destination of Fujisan worship in association with one of the Eight Dragon Kings. People making worship-ascents of Fujisan used the water of these ponds to wash away impurities. These are said to be historical hallowed sites called the "eight lakes at the base of Fujisan" in comparison with the eight lakes of religious training conducted by Hasegawa Kakugyo, and it is thought that they were reactivated by Fuji-ko adherents in 1843.

16 Oshino Hakkai springs (Choshiike Pond)

忍野八海(底抜池)

Oshino Hakkai springs (Choshiike Pond)

These are eight springs formed by Fujisan's subsoil water, and each of the eight ponds was a pilgrimage destination of Fujisan worship in association with one of the Eight Dragon Kings. People making worship-ascents of Fujisan used the water of these ponds to wash away impurities. These are said to be historical hallowed sites called the "eight lakes at the base of Fujisan" in comparison with the eight lakes of religious training conducted by Hasegawa Kakugyo, and it is thought that they were reactivated by Fuji-ko adherents in 1843.

17 Oshino Hakkai springs (Wakuike Pond)

17.jpg

Oshino Hakkai springs (Wakuike Pond)

These are eight springs formed by Fujisan's subsoil water, and each of the eight ponds was a pilgrimage destination of Fujisan worship in association with one of the Eight Dragon Kings. People making worship-ascents of Fujisan used the water of these ponds to wash away impurities. These are said to be historical hallowed sites called the "eight lakes at the base of Fujisan" in comparison with the eight lakes of religious training conducted by Hasegawa Kakugyo, and it is thought that they were reactivated by Fuji-ko adherents in 1843.

18 Oshino Hakkai springs (Nigoriike Pond)

忍野八海(濁池)

Oshino Hakkai springs (Nigoriike Pond)

These are eight springs formed by Fujisan's subsoil water, and each of the eight ponds was a pilgrimage destination of Fujisan worship in association with one of the Eight Dragon Kings. People making worship-ascents of Fujisan used the water of these ponds to wash away impurities. These are said to be historical hallowed sites called the "eight lakes at the base of Fujisan" in comparison with the eight lakes of religious training conducted by Hasegawa Kakugyo, and it is thought that they were reactivated by Fuji-ko adherents in 1843.

19 Oshino Hakkai springs (Kagamiike Pond)

忍野八海(鏡池)

Oshino Hakkai springs (Kagamiike Pond)

These are eight springs formed by Fujisan's subsoil water, and each of the eight ponds was a pilgrimage destination of Fujisan worship in association with one of the Eight Dragon Kings. People making worship-ascents of Fujisan used the water of these ponds to wash away impurities. These are said to be historical hallowed sites called the "eight lakes at the base of Fujisan" in comparison with the eight lakes of religious training conducted by Hasegawa Kakugyo, and it is thought that they were reactivated by Fuji-ko adherents in 1843.

20 Oshino Hakkai springs (Shobuike Pond)

忍野八海(菖蒲池)

Oshino Hakkai springs (Shobuike Pond)

These are eight springs formed by Fujisan's subsoil water, and each of the eight ponds was a pilgrimage destination of Fujisan worship in association with one of the Eight Dragon Kings. People making worship-ascents of Fujisan used the water of these ponds to wash away impurities. These are said to be historical hallowed sites called the "eight lakes at the base of Fujisan" in comparison with the eight lakes of religious training conducted by Hasegawa Kakugyo, and it is thought that they were reactivated by Fuji-ko adherents in 1843.

21 Funatsu lava tree molds

船津胎内樹型

Funatsu lava tree molds

When Hasegawa Kakugyo made the worship-ascent of Fujisan in 1617, a lava tree mold at the north area of the base (thought to be part of the small-scale lava tree molds scattered throughout the Funatsu lava tree molds designated area) were discovered and used it as a place to worship Asama no Okami. The present Funatsu tree-mold cave was discovered by a Fuji-ko leader in 1673.Konohana Sakuya Hime is enshrined in the lava tree molds.

22 Yoshida lava tree molds

吉田胎内樹型

Yoshida lava tree molds

When Hasegawa Kakugyo made the worship-ascent of Fujisan in 1617, a lava tree mold at the north area of the base (thought to be part of the small-scale lava tree molds scattered throughout the Funatsu lava tree molds designated area) were discovered and used it as a place to worship Asama no Okami. The present Funatsu tree-mold cave was discovered by a Fuji-ko leader in 1673, and the Yoshida lava tree molds were found and worshiped as "Shin-tainai" in 1892. Konohana Sakuya Hime is enshrined in the lava tree molds.
*22 The inside of the main cave of Yoshida lava tree molds is not open to the public.

23 Hitoana Fuji-ko Iseki

人穴富士講遺跡

Hitoana Fuji-ko Iseki

The Hitoana wind cave (lava cave) which, according to legend, are the "place where Sengen Daibosatsu (a name for the goddess of Fujisan) resides," are a sacred place. It is said that Hasegawa Kakugyo, who is thought to be the originator of Fuji-ko, underwent religious training and vanished entering Nirvana as a result of ascetic practices here in the 16th and 17th centuries. On the shrine compound there remain approximately 230 monuments that adherents set up to pray for or pay homage to Kakugyo and other predecessors and to record the number of worship-ascents they completed.

24 Shiraito no Taki waterfalls

白糸ノ滝

Shiraito no Taki waterfalls

Shiraito no Taki waterfalls gushes out Fujisan's spring water across approximately 200m. It is thought that in the 15th and 16th centuries Hasegawa Kakugyo, who is thought to be the founder of Fuji-ko, conducted religious practices here and practitioners primarily of Fuji-ko made pilgrimages and conducted religious practices here.

25 Mihonomatsubara pine tree grove

三保松原

Mihonomatsubara pine tree grove

Mihonomatsubara pine tree grove was used as the subject of many Japanese poems after "Man-yoshu," and it also served as the scene for the "Noh" play titled "Hagoromo." In addition, drawings that placed Mihonomatsubara pine tree grove in the front became the typical composition for drawings of Fujisan from the 15th and 16th centuries and onward. Through those and many other works of art, Mihonomatsubara pine tree grove has become widely known as a scenic landscape for viewing Fujisan.

 

The information on this page is taken from the "WORLD HERITAGE FUJISAN" pamphlet published by the Fujisan World Cultural Heritage Council.

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